Our Resources

March 12, 2018


It is human nature to share ideas and opinions with others. At times, it can be difficult to distinguishing the truth from an opinion freely given. Below are resources that may assist you in your personal growth along your grief journey. You determine, from what you learned if the information can assist you in your personal growth or not. The pain of grief comes in many different shades. As unique individuals we feel and respond differently. Discover your healing path with the help of a skilled grief counselor.

“Just as people do not live alike, they do not die alike. Death and dying occur in social context.”

– Cultural Competency in Grief and Loss, by Robin Florelli, MSW, LCSW, and Wanda Jenkins, MHS.

The resources provided below are a variety of recommended readings that may assist you or someone you love in the grieving process.

Grieving the Death of a Pet

March 12, 2018

When a person you love dies, it’s natural to grieve, express your grief and expect friends and family to provide understanding and comfort. Unfortunately, when a beloved pet dies, many people are less understanding of the deep affect it has on your life. Some may think or say, “it’s just a pet” and think that your pain may pass in a matter of days or with the “replacement” of another animal. Nothing could be further from the truth.

The Half Life of Love

February 12, 2018

Our first real date was on Valentine’s Day 10 years ago. Many times in the five years since my partner died, I’ve flashed back to that day when we became, officially, more than just friends.

I Don’t Know Who I Am Anymore: Grief and Loss of Identity

February 5, 2018

Identity is a funny thing. The way we think of ourselves, how we define ourselves, the story we tell ourselves about who we are, all of that comes together to create our identity. And yet we don’t always have a conscious awareness of our identity or even a loss of identity. It often exists in the background, like the soundtrack of a film. We aren’t consciously aware of it until something changes. Seriously, have you ever watched familiar movie clips without the soundtrack? It’s weird.

Helping Children Deal With Grief

October 26, 2017

You can’t protect your kids from the pain of loss, but you can help build healthy coping skills

by Rachel Ehmke

Most young children are aware of death, even if they don’t understand it. Death is a common theme in cartoons and television, and some of your child’s friends may have already lost a loved one. But experiencing grief firsthand is a different and often confusing process for kids. As a parent, you can’t protect a child from the pain of loss, but you can help him feel safe. And by allowing and encouraging him to express his feelings, you can help him build healthy coping skills that will serve him well in the future.

“Option B” by Sheryl Sandberg

September 28, 2017

Perhaps you have already read it – it’s on the best sellers list. It’s “Option B” by Sheryl Sandberg. Sheryl is a top executive at Facebook. Her spouse, also a high exec in technology, died suddenly in 2004, leaving her with 2 young children.

How can we help ourselves heal?

September 28, 2017

Losing someone you love is painful. Often, we may feel a mixture of happiness, sadness, angry and lonely emotions.  These emotions might leave us in a dark place, and we may wonder if we will ever see the light. We question: when does the pain go away? Will I only remember the bad? What will I do now? Where do I start? Will I ever heal?

Sibling Grief

September 28, 2017

Sibling relationships are like no other. There is a commonality that does not often exist in other relationships. When a sibling dies, the loss can be overpowering. Siblings are often thought of as the “forgotten mourners.” Friends, neighbors, and other family members offer comfort and support to Mom and Dad, and often neglect siblings which can disenfranchise their grief.

I Miss You Daddy!

September 28, 2017

When a child loses someone they love and feel close to, they are often experiencing overwhelming emotions they have never had before and they don’t know what to do with them. Many times the adults in their life are going through the same thing at the same time and don’t quite know how to best support the children around them when they themselves are in such need of support. Children like adults will heal from their grief if it is shared with others and not kept inside tucked away like a volcano hotly smoldering

Grief is Not An Enemy

September 28, 2017

Grief is a highly personal and normal response

to life-changing events – a process

that can lead to healing and personal growth.


At my brother’s funeral a lady said, You seem to be doing so well.”

“No, I’m doing quite poorly, thank you,” I responded.

She did not give up, and said, “Well, you don’t seem to be upset.”  I did not want to get into any discussion, but I had acted as if nothing had happened as long as I could – and I reacted.

“If I were doing well with my grief, I would be over in the corner curled up in a fetal position crying, not standing here acting as though no one had died.”

We are doing well with our grief when we are grieving.  Somehow we have it backwards.  We think people are doing well when they aren’t crying.  Grief is a process of walking through some painful periods toward learning to cope again.

We do not walk this path without pain and tears.  When we are in the most pain, we are making the most progress.  When the pain is less we are coasting, and resting for the next steps.  People need to grieve.  Grief is not the enemy to be avoided; it is a healing path to be walked.

By Doug Manning, excerpt from

The Gift of Significance